Posts Tagged ‘Outdoors’

Take Me Out to the Ball……No, Wait….Take Me Out For a Walk

loki-walkYour four-legged tail waggin’ friends need at least 30 minutes of walking every day! Why?
Because regular walks can help combat pet obesity and go paw in hand with good nutrition. Obesity can lead to other conditions plaguing your pet with illnesses like arthritis and diabetes.

Daily walks also add to healthy bonding with your pet. Spend quality time with your furry family strengthens your bond and gets both of you moving and that is a good thing. Dog parents sweat more than people without pets and this lowers the risk of heart disease, diabetes and cancer too! So if you’re looking for encouragement to get up off the couch, get a dog and both of you get movin’ and put one paw in front of the other for a healthy lifestyle.

They say a tired dog is a good dog! Having 6 dogs at home, I assure you, this is a very true statement! Walking quiets the mind, quenches curiosity and helps to get all the energy out of their system. Energy that may be destructive. So a good dog walkin’ is constructive and pawsitive!!
tosh-sleepy

 

 

 

 

Lookin’ to have insurance for your paw prancing buddy? Check out www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for your no obligation quote.

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14

10 2016

Burrs

You had a great time hiking through fields and forests, but now it’s time to pay the price. It seems your companion brought home a coat filled with bristly souvenirs- and you’re in charge of Operation Unstick.
Burrs are the rough, prickly seedcases of certain plants, and they seem to leap out whenever your pet passes by. Depending on where they lodge, burrs can cause matting, skin irritation or infection. What’s more, they can be as hard to remove as chewing gum.
To get around this thorny problem, try these tips from the experts.
Look for hideaways. Burs can stick in the darnedest places, so you’ll want to inspect your pet closely for these hidden prickly pains, says Hazel Christiansen, owner of Blue Ribbon Pet Grooming Shop Association. “Check between all the toes, on top of the feet, around the testicles and in the armpits- Just about anyplace there’s a little crevice,” she says.
Take the dry road. Once burrs get snarled into your pet’s coat, be sure to remove them before he manages to get himself wet. “The tangled hair around the burr will shrink like a wool sweater after it gets wet, and you’ll have an extra-hard time trying to get the burr out,” says Linda A. Law, a certified master groomer and director of the Canine Clippers School of Pet Grooming in Dumfries, Virginia.
Put your fingers to work. “It’s really important to remove burrs as soon as you can so they don’t dig in and create mats and irritations,” says Law.
If the burr has only recently lodged, you may be able to remove it with just your fingers or a pair of tweezers. If it’s been there longer, however, it may be tangled inside a hair mat. To undo the mat, pull it apart with your fingers little by little, working from the end of the hairs down toward the roots. After you get the burr out, run a comb or brush through the hair to really smooth things out, advises Law.
Loosen ‘em with a lube job. When a burr is really tangled, applying a little vegetable oil will help get it loose, says Shirlee Kalstone, a New York City groomer and author of The Complete Poodle Clipping and Grooming Book. A spritz of detangling spray, available at pet stores, can also help. If you’re buying a detangling spray for your cat, however, read the label to make sure it’s feline-friendly, Kalstone adds.
Try the kindest cut. If you’re have trouble removing burrs with your fingers, try cutting them out, says Kathe Barsotti, a certified master groomer and owner of Featherle Pet Care in Herndon and Sterling, Virginia. She recommends using blunt-tipped scissors to avoid accidentally gouging your pet. It’s best to cut perpendicular to the mat, not parallel to it. “Just make sure you’re cutting hair and not skin,” she says.
Keep it short. Keeping your pet’s coat neatly trimmed won’t prevent burrs from sticking, but it will make them easier to remove. “Then at least the burrs won’t stick so badly,” Barsotti says.
Pass up prickly places. In the future, the one sure way to avoid burrs is to stay away from infested areas. If you’ve had a problem with one trail or field, walk your animal somewhere else next time,” says Kalstone.

For more ideas read The Doctors Book of Home Remedies for Dogs and Cats for these and more ideas.

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

 

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22

09 2011


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