Posts Tagged ‘Breed’

It’s the Great Pumpkin Time

Yes, we all remember “It’s the Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown”.  That fall fun for Snoopy and the gang. Doesn’t seem we ever grow out of the classics.

kitty-on-a-pumpkinDid you know that Pumpkin is good for your pets?

It’s full of fiber that can soothe upset bellies and keep their digestion regular.  Pumpkin can be used to treat both diarrhea and constipation because of this fiber content.
It can make tummies feel full which assists in weight management.
It contains vitamins, minerals and carotenoids that support the immune system which keeps their skin and fur glowing all while assisting in cancer prevention.

While you set out to enjoy your Pumpkin Spiced Latte’s, Pumpkin Cheesecake, Pumpkin Muffins, how about finding some time to make this pet friendly Pumpkin Meatball recipe for a tasty treat so your pet isn’t jealous of your pumpkin indulgence.

Pumpkin Meatballs
Ingredients:
1 lb. ground chicken
1/2 c. pumpkin puree (or canned pumpkin unseasoned)
1/4 c. parsley, chopped

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350F. Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper. Mix all ingredients in a bowl, then roll into 1-inch meatballs and place each 1/2-inch apart.  Bake for 15 minutes or until slightly brown on top.  Let cool and serve.  Freeze unused portions for use within the next few days.

Your furry friend will be delighted that you made something special for them and they will surely be pumpkin’ up to give you a kiss and say thank you.

Enjoy!!

Info and recipe provided by Fetch Magazine!

Lookin’ to have insurance for your pumpkin’ lovin’, paw prancin’ buddy?
Check out www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurandinsure for your no obligation quote.

 

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21

10 2016

Hyperactivity – Is There an Answer

tosh-smDogs are just about the most loyal animal you can find. Were you aware they too can exhibit hyperactivity just like people?

Know your breed!! Some breeds are more hyper than others. Sadly, when humans can’t handle the dog because of their hyper nature, the animal ends up at a shelter. Let’s not watch this happen. Learn the characteristics of the dog you wish to adopt. Understand how your schedule is going to affect the dog.
When our schedules are jam-packed, the dogs boundless displays of energy can make any dog owner feel like they are going to lose their mind.

Here are some helpful tips.

1) Make sure your dog is getting plenty of exercise. A tired dog is a good dog, and there is nothing better for soothing a wild beast than a great workout. A workout makes humans feel better, and it does the same for our four-legged friends too. Playing fetch, going for a jog, swim or even just a long walk can exhaust your dog in a short amount of time.

dog-toy2) Still Puzzled? Mental stimulation is essential so break our the puzzles. Not jigsaw puzzles, but food puzzles and treat-releasing toys as well as inside-the-house games like “find the toy”. Making your dog think for what he/she wants is great for them…the treat release is an added reward letting them know they did well.

3) Obedience Training. This isn’t about teaching your dog how to do tricks. It’s about your dog bonding and spending time with you. It’s also about learning basic manners and commands that will make every other activity you take on a little easier and more rewarding.

If you still have difficulties with your pet, consult your veterinarian. They may have more solutions that can help or may recommend a special trainer who can help you both along your journey.

Would you like to know more about Pet Insurance? For your no obligation quote visit www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure

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04

10 2016

Labrador Retriever

History The original Labradors were all-purpose water dogs originating in Newfoundland, not Labrador. Not only did the breed not originate in Labrador, but it also was not originally called the Labrador Retriever. The Newfoundland of the early 1800s came in different sizes, one of which was the “Lesser” of “St. John’s” Newfoundland- the earliest incarnation of the Labrador. These dogs- medium-sized black dogs with close hair- not only retrieved game but also retrieved fish, pulled small fishing boats through icy water, and helped the fisherman in any task involving swimming. Eventually the breed died out in Newfoundland in large part because of a heavy dog tax. However, a core of Labradors had been taken to England in the early 1800s, and it is from these dogs, along with crosses to other retrievers, that the breed continued. It was also in England that the breed earned its reputation as an extraordinary retriever of upland game. Initially breeders favored black Labs, and culled yellow and chocolate colors. By early 1900s the other colors had become acceptable, although still not as widely favored as the blacks. The breed was recognized by the English Kennel Club in 1903 and by the AKC in 1917. The popularity of this breed has grown steadily until it became the most popular breed in America in 1991 and remains so today. Temperament Few breeds so richly deserve their popularity as does the Labrador Retriever. When trained, it is obedient and amiable, and tolerates well the antics of children, other dogs, and other pets. It will be a calm housedog, playful yard dog, and intense field dog all on the same day. It is eager to please, enjoys learning, and excels in obedience. It is a powerful breed that loves to swim and retrieve. It needs daily physical and mental challenges to keep it occupied, however; a bored Lab can get into trouble. The Labrador’s hunting instinct drives it to roam; breeders say “his home is under his hat.” Upkeep Labradors are active and sociable dogs. They need daily exercise, preferably in the form of retrieving or swimming. Owners with swimming pools either must fence them out or be prepared to share the pool with the dog. The Lab coat sheds water easily. It needs weekly brushing to remove dead hair. Although Labs can live outdoors in temperate climates, they are much happier indoors with their family. Health • Major concerns: CHD (Coronary Heart Disease), elbow dysplasia, OCD, obesity, patellar luxation (knee problem that causes lameness) • Minor concerns: cataract, CPRA (Central progressive retinal atrophy (CPRA) is a different disease from PRA involving the retinal pigment epithelium “http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_retinal_atrophy”), hot spots, retinal dysplasia, hypothyroidism • Occasionally seen: diabetes, entropian also called cherry eye, distichiasis (effects the growth of eye lashes) • Suggested tests: hip, elbow, eye, knee • Life span: 10-12 years Form and Function The Labrador is a moderate dog, not extreme in any way. It is square of slightly longer than tall, of fairly large bone and substance. Its broad head and strong jaws should enable it to carry the largest game birds, such as Canada geese. Its heavy body set and strong legs enable it to swim and run powerfully. Its coat, which is short, straight, and dense with a soft undercoat, is weather-proof and helps to protect it from icy waters. The Lab is a working retriever and should possess style without over refinement and substance without clumsiness. (information from Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds Second Edition by D. Caroline Colie, Ph.D.)

 

 

 

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05

11 2011

Somali

With its bushy tail and arched back, this cat is one of the world’s most popular new breeds.  Like its shorthaired Abyssinian forebear, the Somali has a ticked coat: Each hair on its body has three to twelve bands of color.  The bands are darker than the ground color and produce a vibrant shimmer when the cat is in full coat.  The facial markings are striking, resembling theatrical eyeliner.  Somalis are natural hunters and thrive in the outdoors.

The head has a moderate wedge, with smooth lines and slight nose break in profile.  Ears are wide-set, large, cupped and tufted.  The faces of Somalis have dark-rimmed eyes surrounded by “spectacles” of lighter hair, and show clear tabby markings on their cheeks and forehead.  The body is medium sized, lithe and muscular.  Legs are long with paws that are rounded and tufted.  The tail is long with a full brush of hair.  The coat is soft, fine, and of medium length.

Breed History

The genetic roots of this breed go back to founder stock in Britain.  Longhaired kittens appeared occasionally in Abyssinian litters, and in the 1940s, breeder Janet Robertson exported Abyssinians to North America and Australia.

Decedents of these Abyssinians sometimes produce fuzzy, dark kittens: In the 1960s, a Canadian breeder, Ken McGill produced the official first Somali.  Using McGill’s stock, the breed was fully developed in North America by the late 1970s.  Somalis appeared in Europe in the 1980s, and by 1991 had worldwide recognition.

Overview

Date of origin: 1963

Place of Origin: Canada and the United States

Ancestry: Abyssinian

Other Name: Longhaired Abyssinian

Weight Range: 8-12 lbs (3.5-5.5 kg)

Temperament: Quiet but extroverted; Active  and Sociable.

Grooming: Moderate

 

 

 

 

 
Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

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27

10 2011


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