Posts Tagged ‘Arthritis’

Stinky Problems

From time to time your pet may experience problems with relieving themselves in places they shouldn’t. Sometimes it can be a medical problem, sometimes a behavioral problem.  So how do you know?

Our friends at Fetch Magazine shared some content with us and we are passing it along.

Litter issues for Cats

Medical causes could be…

Walk this way:  A cat with arthritis could be in too much pain to step over the wall of the litter box, while a cat with a neurologic condition may be too weak or wobbly to walk to it.

Eye See:  Illnesses like heart disease, kidney disease, hypertension or3infection can cause blindness, making it difficult for the cat to find the box.

Bladder Matters:  Urinary tract infections, urinary crystals, bladder inflammation or a blockage (which is a veterinary emergency!) can also lead to accidents in the house.

Emotional Causes could be…

Clean House:  Cats generally like to be clean, so if the litter box isn’t, they’ll find another location to relieve themselves – perhaps the laundry basket, tub or even your bed.

Lousy Litter:  Some cats may not use the box if they dislike the scent, texture or amount of litter being used.

Location, Location, Location:  Litter boxes placed next to a noisy washing machine, crammed under a bathroom vanity or found only on the third floor of the house likely don’t offer the peace, privacy and accessibility that cats need to do their business.

Afraid So:  In multi-cat households, an inadequate number of boxes or previous litter box squabbles with other housemates could make a feline friend fearful of using the box.

cat litter box

Cat’s are purrsnickety, so be sure to try some of these suggestions so you both are happy.

 

 

Potty Problems for the Pooch

Medical causes could be…

Hold It:  A wide range of conditions – including diabetes, Cushing’s disease and illnesses of the kidneys, liver or brain – can all cause dogs to make more urine than normal (polyuria), or make them incapable of holding urine.

Gotta Go:  Urinary tract infections cause a sense of urgency to run to the bathroom, while urinary incontinence causes bed wetting or dribbling urine while standing.

Senior Moment:  Aging or senile dogs may not be able to make it outside in time or may be unaware that they’re urinating in the house.

Emotional Causes could be…

Pup-Pee:  Puppies who are having urine accidents may need some additional house-training reinforcement, or they could be intentionally having “accidents” to seek attention. (Hey, it works!  Even if it is negative attention.)

Nature Calls:  Naturally submissive or excitable dogs can have frequent accidents, while separation anxiety or territoriality could also lead to unwanted puddles in the house and can happen to dogs of any age.

So if you’re experiencing any of these issues look for the signs and consult your veterinary professional for assistance.  Don’t lose hope.  Remember, there may be reasons for your pet’s behavior and finding the right answer will keep you both happy.

Consider Pet Insurance to help offset the cost of veterinary care when your pet is sick.
Obtain your no obligation quote today. http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure

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13

04 2017

Take Me Out to the Ball……No, Wait….Take Me Out For a Walk

loki-walkYour four-legged tail waggin’ friends need at least 30 minutes of walking every day! Why?
Because regular walks can help combat pet obesity and go paw in hand with good nutrition. Obesity can lead to other conditions plaguing your pet with illnesses like arthritis and diabetes.

Daily walks also add to healthy bonding with your pet. Spend quality time with your furry family strengthens your bond and gets both of you moving and that is a good thing. Dog parents sweat more than people without pets and this lowers the risk of heart disease, diabetes and cancer too! So if you’re looking for encouragement to get up off the couch, get a dog and both of you get movin’ and put one paw in front of the other for a healthy lifestyle.

They say a tired dog is a good dog! Having 6 dogs at home, I assure you, this is a very true statement! Walking quiets the mind, quenches curiosity and helps to get all the energy out of their system. Energy that may be destructive. So a good dog walkin’ is constructive and pawsitive!!
tosh-sleepy

 

 

 

 

Lookin’ to have insurance for your paw prancing buddy? Check out www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for your no obligation quote.

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14

10 2016

Arthritis

Humans aren’t the only ones who can be affected by Arthritis.  Your pets are susceptible to this disease as well.  If you notice your dog is slow to move, whines because of discomfort, walks stiffly, he/she may be suffering from arthritic pain.

Be sure to take him/her to the vet so that a proper diagnosis can be made.  You as a pet parent can do a few things to help your arthritic dog.

First, Bring your dog in for regular checkups which will allow your veterinarian monitor your dog’s arthritis and set a treatment plan of action into effect.

Second, reducing your pet’s weight (if overweight) can help decrease the load on his or her joints.  Feed your dog the right amount of high-quality food and this will help with weight control.

Third, carefully monitored exercise on soft surfaces can help.  Your vet may have a few suggestions.

Fourth, arthritis is aggravated by the cold and damp, be sure to keep your dog warm and dry.  A padded dog bed will help alleviate discomfort from sleeping on hard surfaces.  Warm compresses can also assist in soothing affected joints.

Fifth, massage therapy can help to increase your dog’s flexibility, circulation and sense of well-being.  Your vet may have the name of a professional animal massage therapist.

Sixth, pain medication may be necessary, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs can also be an important part of managing osteoarthritis.  Don’t ever give your dog a drug without your veterinarian’s recommendation.  Drugs that are safe for humans may not be for dogs.

Seventh, Glucosamine and chondroitin supplements can be used to help manage arthritis in dogs and other animals.  Be sure to consult your veterinarian before implementing any treatment.

Eighth, Acupuncture isn’t just for humans. It’s painless and has shown some success in animals suffering from arthritis pain.

Ninth, surgery may be an option in advanced cases of canine arthritis.  Be sure to discuss all the factors and risks of surgery with your vet.  Be an educated pet owner before making a decision involving surgery.

Tenth, a low-stress environment, lots of affection and love, and supportive care can aid in improving your dog’s quality of life.

Please remember, many pain relievers that may help dogs and people are poisonous to cats so please do not implement any treatment to a cat that you would a dog without first consulting your veterinarian professional.

 

Slip-free flooring, soft bedding, ramps instead of steps, a warm, dry environment and help with grooming can be beneficial to an arthritic dog.

We love our pets and we hate to watch their pain but with proper education and TLC, we can help them along their journey to a long healthy life.

 

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

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26

09 2012

Arthritis

Ease the Aches
When your dog gets out of bed in the morning, does he hobble like a wounded war hero? Is your once-graceful cat shuffling around like Walter Brennan? Arthritis can be a real pain in the neck – not to mention the hip, elbow and back.
While there are many kinds of arthritis, the one most likely to strike your pet is osteoarthritis. Also called degenerative joint disease, it usually comes about after years of wear and tear on hard-working joints.
Large pets are especially vulnerable to osteoarthritis, but even the smallest cat can feel its piercing pangs. “It hurts, and without your help, it’s not going to feel better,” says Mark M. Smith, D.V.M., associate professor of surgery in the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in Blacksburg, Virginia, and co-author of Atlas of Approaches for General Surgery of the Dog and Cat.
Once your pet starts getting arthritis, he’s going to need a vet’s care. Your vet may advise giving anti-inflammatory drugs, like buffered aspirin or cortisone. Even acupuncture can be a big help. In addition, there are many things you can do at home to help him get around more comfortably.
Lighten his load. Heavy pets are considerably more likely to suffer joint pain than their slimmer counterparts. “Slimming him down is one of the best things you can do for him,” says James D. Lincoln, D.V.M., associate professor and chief of small animal surgery at the Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine in Pullman. “It reduces the stress on the joints and can provide enormous relief.
Helping him shed a few pounds may be as simple as cutting treats and table scraps from his diet. You also may want to switch him to a food that is less fat and more fiber than the one he’s been getting. That way he can eat the same amount but consume fewer calories.
Put his best paw forward. Regular exercise is vital to controlling the progression of arthritis, which is why vets often recommend taking pets for a 20 minute walk several times a day.
Many cats adore going for walks, although they often insist on setting the course! Because felines wriggle out of collars so easily, it’s usually best to fit them with a harness.
If your cat isn’t leash-trained, having a lively play session – with a ball, a pull toy or some other “active” toy- is a good substitute.
“Good muscle tone and muscle mass will help alleviate undue force on the arthritic joint,” Dr. Smith says.
If 20 minutes seems too long, try taking shorter walks up and down small hills. Walking on the beach is also fine, as long as your pet doesn’t run or dig too much. “Experiment and see what he likes,” says Dr. Smith. “If he’s more lame than usual the next day, you know you’ve done too much. Just use common sense and don’t overdo it.” It’s also a good idea to check with your vet before beginning any new exercise plan.
Try some home improvements. If your pet sleeps outdoors, make sure his usual abode is well-protected. “Cover it with a plastic sheet or insulation so the cold wind doesn’t stiffen his joints,” says David E. Harling, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in Greensboro, North Carolina, who specializes in orthopedics and ophthalmology.
Let him sleep in. “When it’s cold and damp outside, your arthritic pet is going to hurt,” says Ralph Womer, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in Auburn, Alabama. “Your pet’s joints will thank you if you bring him inside for the night.
Make a cozy bed. “If your pet is sleeping on a hard surface, he’ll probably get some relieve fi you switch to something soft,” says Dr. Harling. During the cold months, he’ll appreciate curling up on a soft layer of synthetic fleece. You can even invest in a heated pet bed, available in some pet stores and animal supply companies.
Lay on something warm. A little moist heat, applied directly over painful joints, can be a real comfort to arthritic pets, says Sue Stephens, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
One trick is to use a hot water bottle (filled with warm, not hot, water). Or soak a towel in warm water, wring it out and drape it over the affected area. When the towel cools, replace it with a fresh one.
Apply the heat twice a day, morning and evening, for about 15 minutes each time. “It makes them feel so much better, especially in the morning when they tend to be stiffer,” says Dr. Stephens.
Be the Wizard of Ahs. Have you ever felt achy, and then some kind soul gave you a soothing massage? “Imagine being able to do that for your pet,” says Robert A. Montgomery, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in New Philadelphia, Ohio.
Gently kneed the sore area with small, circular motions, Dr. Montgomery says. Gradually extend the massage until you’ve gone a few inches beyond the painful joint, then gradually work your way back. “Once the animal looks more relaxed than when you started, you’ve done something right,” says Dr. Montgomery.
Raise the dinner table. If your pet has a stiff neck, try putting his food and water bowls up off the floor so he doesn’t have to lower his head as much at mealtimes, suggests Dr. Harling. You can put the bowls on a block of wood or in a firm box. Or you can buy a pet-bowl stand at pet stores.
For more ideas read The Doctors Book of Home Remedies for Dogs and Cats for these and more ideas.

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

 

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18

08 2011


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