Posts Tagged ‘Animal’

Stinky Problems

From time to time your pet may experience problems with relieving themselves in places they shouldn’t. Sometimes it can be a medical problem, sometimes a behavioral problem.  So how do you know?

Our friends at Fetch Magazine shared some content with us and we are passing it along.

Litter issues for Cats

Medical causes could be…

Walk this way:  A cat with arthritis could be in too much pain to step over the wall of the litter box, while a cat with a neurologic condition may be too weak or wobbly to walk to it.

Eye See:  Illnesses like heart disease, kidney disease, hypertension or3infection can cause blindness, making it difficult for the cat to find the box.

Bladder Matters:  Urinary tract infections, urinary crystals, bladder inflammation or a blockage (which is a veterinary emergency!) can also lead to accidents in the house.

Emotional Causes could be…

Clean House:  Cats generally like to be clean, so if the litter box isn’t, they’ll find another location to relieve themselves – perhaps the laundry basket, tub or even your bed.

Lousy Litter:  Some cats may not use the box if they dislike the scent, texture or amount of litter being used.

Location, Location, Location:  Litter boxes placed next to a noisy washing machine, crammed under a bathroom vanity or found only on the third floor of the house likely don’t offer the peace, privacy and accessibility that cats need to do their business.

Afraid So:  In multi-cat households, an inadequate number of boxes or previous litter box squabbles with other housemates could make a feline friend fearful of using the box.

cat litter box

Cat’s are purrsnickety, so be sure to try some of these suggestions so you both are happy.

 

 

Potty Problems for the Pooch

Medical causes could be…

Hold It:  A wide range of conditions – including diabetes, Cushing’s disease and illnesses of the kidneys, liver or brain – can all cause dogs to make more urine than normal (polyuria), or make them incapable of holding urine.

Gotta Go:  Urinary tract infections cause a sense of urgency to run to the bathroom, while urinary incontinence causes bed wetting or dribbling urine while standing.

Senior Moment:  Aging or senile dogs may not be able to make it outside in time or may be unaware that they’re urinating in the house.

Emotional Causes could be…

Pup-Pee:  Puppies who are having urine accidents may need some additional house-training reinforcement, or they could be intentionally having “accidents” to seek attention. (Hey, it works!  Even if it is negative attention.)

Nature Calls:  Naturally submissive or excitable dogs can have frequent accidents, while separation anxiety or territoriality could also lead to unwanted puddles in the house and can happen to dogs of any age.

So if you’re experiencing any of these issues look for the signs and consult your veterinary professional for assistance.  Don’t lose hope.  Remember, there may be reasons for your pet’s behavior and finding the right answer will keep you both happy.

Consider Pet Insurance to help offset the cost of veterinary care when your pet is sick.
Obtain your no obligation quote today. http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure

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13

04 2017

New Year – Here’s to Your Health

Top Health Benefits of Pets

Not only are pets good companions, but they’re good for our health! Here are a few ways that dogs and cats help our minds and bodies.

 

  1. Stress Relievers

There’s nothing like a warm, cozy cuddle session to melt away stress after a long day. Calming cuddles with your pet can lower blood pressure and reduce anxiety levels.

 

  1. Heart Helpers

Pets can have a positive effect on our hearts. Studies have reported better survival rates for heart attack patients with pets and improved heart rate variability, which is an indicator of heart health.

 

  1. Mental Boosters

Our furry friends can help combat depression. In studies, pet-assisted therapy helped reduce depression in chemotherapy patients. Pets also reduced stress for people caring for loved ones with dementia.

 

 

Return the favor by taking great care of your pet’s health for a long and happy life.  www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure
ASPCA Pet Insurance plan can help you manage the costs of your pet’s health care.  Click the link above for your no obligation quote.

Information provided by our friends at ASPCA Pet Insurance.

 

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27

01 2017

It’s the Great Pumpkin Time

Yes, we all remember “It’s the Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown”.  That fall fun for Snoopy and the gang. Doesn’t seem we ever grow out of the classics.

kitty-on-a-pumpkinDid you know that Pumpkin is good for your pets?

It’s full of fiber that can soothe upset bellies and keep their digestion regular.  Pumpkin can be used to treat both diarrhea and constipation because of this fiber content.
It can make tummies feel full which assists in weight management.
It contains vitamins, minerals and carotenoids that support the immune system which keeps their skin and fur glowing all while assisting in cancer prevention.

While you set out to enjoy your Pumpkin Spiced Latte’s, Pumpkin Cheesecake, Pumpkin Muffins, how about finding some time to make this pet friendly Pumpkin Meatball recipe for a tasty treat so your pet isn’t jealous of your pumpkin indulgence.

Pumpkin Meatballs
Ingredients:
1 lb. ground chicken
1/2 c. pumpkin puree (or canned pumpkin unseasoned)
1/4 c. parsley, chopped

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350F. Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper. Mix all ingredients in a bowl, then roll into 1-inch meatballs and place each 1/2-inch apart.  Bake for 15 minutes or until slightly brown on top.  Let cool and serve.  Freeze unused portions for use within the next few days.

Your furry friend will be delighted that you made something special for them and they will surely be pumpkin’ up to give you a kiss and say thank you.

Enjoy!!

Info and recipe provided by Fetch Magazine!

Lookin’ to have insurance for your pumpkin’ lovin’, paw prancin’ buddy?
Check out www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurandinsure for your no obligation quote.

 

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21

10 2016

Take Me Out to the Ball……No, Wait….Take Me Out For a Walk

loki-walkYour four-legged tail waggin’ friends need at least 30 minutes of walking every day! Why?
Because regular walks can help combat pet obesity and go paw in hand with good nutrition. Obesity can lead to other conditions plaguing your pet with illnesses like arthritis and diabetes.

Daily walks also add to healthy bonding with your pet. Spend quality time with your furry family strengthens your bond and gets both of you moving and that is a good thing. Dog parents sweat more than people without pets and this lowers the risk of heart disease, diabetes and cancer too! So if you’re looking for encouragement to get up off the couch, get a dog and both of you get movin’ and put one paw in front of the other for a healthy lifestyle.

They say a tired dog is a good dog! Having 6 dogs at home, I assure you, this is a very true statement! Walking quiets the mind, quenches curiosity and helps to get all the energy out of their system. Energy that may be destructive. So a good dog walkin’ is constructive and pawsitive!!
tosh-sleepy

 

 

 

 

Lookin’ to have insurance for your paw prancing buddy? Check out www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for your no obligation quote.

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14

10 2016

Hyperactivity – Is There an Answer

tosh-smDogs are just about the most loyal animal you can find. Were you aware they too can exhibit hyperactivity just like people?

Know your breed!! Some breeds are more hyper than others. Sadly, when humans can’t handle the dog because of their hyper nature, the animal ends up at a shelter. Let’s not watch this happen. Learn the characteristics of the dog you wish to adopt. Understand how your schedule is going to affect the dog.
When our schedules are jam-packed, the dogs boundless displays of energy can make any dog owner feel like they are going to lose their mind.

Here are some helpful tips.

1) Make sure your dog is getting plenty of exercise. A tired dog is a good dog, and there is nothing better for soothing a wild beast than a great workout. A workout makes humans feel better, and it does the same for our four-legged friends too. Playing fetch, going for a jog, swim or even just a long walk can exhaust your dog in a short amount of time.

dog-toy2) Still Puzzled? Mental stimulation is essential so break our the puzzles. Not jigsaw puzzles, but food puzzles and treat-releasing toys as well as inside-the-house games like “find the toy”. Making your dog think for what he/she wants is great for them…the treat release is an added reward letting them know they did well.

3) Obedience Training. This isn’t about teaching your dog how to do tricks. It’s about your dog bonding and spending time with you. It’s also about learning basic manners and commands that will make every other activity you take on a little easier and more rewarding.

If you still have difficulties with your pet, consult your veterinarian. They may have more solutions that can help or may recommend a special trainer who can help you both along your journey.

Would you like to know more about Pet Insurance? For your no obligation quote visit www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure

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04

10 2016

Arthritis

Humans aren’t the only ones who can be affected by Arthritis.  Your pets are susceptible to this disease as well.  If you notice your dog is slow to move, whines because of discomfort, walks stiffly, he/she may be suffering from arthritic pain.

Be sure to take him/her to the vet so that a proper diagnosis can be made.  You as a pet parent can do a few things to help your arthritic dog.

First, Bring your dog in for regular checkups which will allow your veterinarian monitor your dog’s arthritis and set a treatment plan of action into effect.

Second, reducing your pet’s weight (if overweight) can help decrease the load on his or her joints.  Feed your dog the right amount of high-quality food and this will help with weight control.

Third, carefully monitored exercise on soft surfaces can help.  Your vet may have a few suggestions.

Fourth, arthritis is aggravated by the cold and damp, be sure to keep your dog warm and dry.  A padded dog bed will help alleviate discomfort from sleeping on hard surfaces.  Warm compresses can also assist in soothing affected joints.

Fifth, massage therapy can help to increase your dog’s flexibility, circulation and sense of well-being.  Your vet may have the name of a professional animal massage therapist.

Sixth, pain medication may be necessary, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs can also be an important part of managing osteoarthritis.  Don’t ever give your dog a drug without your veterinarian’s recommendation.  Drugs that are safe for humans may not be for dogs.

Seventh, Glucosamine and chondroitin supplements can be used to help manage arthritis in dogs and other animals.  Be sure to consult your veterinarian before implementing any treatment.

Eighth, Acupuncture isn’t just for humans. It’s painless and has shown some success in animals suffering from arthritis pain.

Ninth, surgery may be an option in advanced cases of canine arthritis.  Be sure to discuss all the factors and risks of surgery with your vet.  Be an educated pet owner before making a decision involving surgery.

Tenth, a low-stress environment, lots of affection and love, and supportive care can aid in improving your dog’s quality of life.

Please remember, many pain relievers that may help dogs and people are poisonous to cats so please do not implement any treatment to a cat that you would a dog without first consulting your veterinarian professional.

 

Slip-free flooring, soft bedding, ramps instead of steps, a warm, dry environment and help with grooming can be beneficial to an arthritic dog.

We love our pets and we hate to watch their pain but with proper education and TLC, we can help them along their journey to a long healthy life.

 

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

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26

09 2012

Saying Goodbye to a Friend and Companion

If anyone has lost a pet, you know how hard it is to say goodbye to your companion, your friend and to some – family.  For me, one of the most difficult things to do is having to make the choice to have a pet put down.  It’s hard enough losing an animal but to have to make the decision for them is heart wrenching.

Animals can’t tell you when they are sick or when they hurt.  You need to deduce their illness based on behavior.  Some animals, like cats, will go great lengths to show that they are not ill.  This is a survival instinct.  Change in appetite, change in sleep patterns, in exercise, urination or defecation, lack of play…these are all signs that something isn’t right with your pet.   When this happens, seek veterinary assistance immediately.  The sooner an animal is treated, the better they will feel and you will too.

Today I find myself in one of those very difficult situations where I have done all I can for one of my animals.  For several months we have tried various things to help him yet his weight is down another pound and he is now half the cat he used to be.  After discussing matters with the vet, weighing what the illness possibilities are verses his age and the amount of testing he would have to go through, as a family we decided to not allow him to suffer through all that.  We allowed him to go peacefully and with dignity.

This was such a difficult decision since I had rescued him from my neighborhood where he was starving just about 9 years ago.  He was about the same weight when he died as he was when I found him.  Previous owners had declawed all four of his paws and he had no means of defending himself or of catching any prey for his supper.  For three months I religiously brought fresh food and water out to him.  He would never let me get close to him.  Then one October day when the temperatures dropped so low, this poor cat couldn’t take being cold one more day.  As I went outside to bring him food and water, he crawled into my lap without coaxing.  I picked him up and he wrapped his paws around my neck and waist and held on tightly much the same as a two year old child would.  I took him in, gave him a blanket to snuggle in, took him to the vet to be checked out because I had other cats, and we found that he was very ill from eating something in the wild.  He had an intestinal infection of sorts and one of the worse cases of ear mites the vet had ever seen; so bad in fact that they were completely swollen shut.

 

Within a few months he began improving, eating better, allowing us to touch him once in a while and he took a liking to my other male cat.  They were good friends and played well together.

I was able to give him 9 additional years to his life that he would not have had if he remained out doors.  Still, it is painful to say goodbye but in my mind, I see him watching birds and chasing butterflies somewhere in a field we have yet to experience.

Goodbye dear friend, Lunar.  

 

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

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22

02 2012

Arthritis

Ease the Aches
When your dog gets out of bed in the morning, does he hobble like a wounded war hero? Is your once-graceful cat shuffling around like Walter Brennan? Arthritis can be a real pain in the neck – not to mention the hip, elbow and back.
While there are many kinds of arthritis, the one most likely to strike your pet is osteoarthritis. Also called degenerative joint disease, it usually comes about after years of wear and tear on hard-working joints.
Large pets are especially vulnerable to osteoarthritis, but even the smallest cat can feel its piercing pangs. “It hurts, and without your help, it’s not going to feel better,” says Mark M. Smith, D.V.M., associate professor of surgery in the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in Blacksburg, Virginia, and co-author of Atlas of Approaches for General Surgery of the Dog and Cat.
Once your pet starts getting arthritis, he’s going to need a vet’s care. Your vet may advise giving anti-inflammatory drugs, like buffered aspirin or cortisone. Even acupuncture can be a big help. In addition, there are many things you can do at home to help him get around more comfortably.
Lighten his load. Heavy pets are considerably more likely to suffer joint pain than their slimmer counterparts. “Slimming him down is one of the best things you can do for him,” says James D. Lincoln, D.V.M., associate professor and chief of small animal surgery at the Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine in Pullman. “It reduces the stress on the joints and can provide enormous relief.
Helping him shed a few pounds may be as simple as cutting treats and table scraps from his diet. You also may want to switch him to a food that is less fat and more fiber than the one he’s been getting. That way he can eat the same amount but consume fewer calories.
Put his best paw forward. Regular exercise is vital to controlling the progression of arthritis, which is why vets often recommend taking pets for a 20 minute walk several times a day.
Many cats adore going for walks, although they often insist on setting the course! Because felines wriggle out of collars so easily, it’s usually best to fit them with a harness.
If your cat isn’t leash-trained, having a lively play session – with a ball, a pull toy or some other “active” toy- is a good substitute.
“Good muscle tone and muscle mass will help alleviate undue force on the arthritic joint,” Dr. Smith says.
If 20 minutes seems too long, try taking shorter walks up and down small hills. Walking on the beach is also fine, as long as your pet doesn’t run or dig too much. “Experiment and see what he likes,” says Dr. Smith. “If he’s more lame than usual the next day, you know you’ve done too much. Just use common sense and don’t overdo it.” It’s also a good idea to check with your vet before beginning any new exercise plan.
Try some home improvements. If your pet sleeps outdoors, make sure his usual abode is well-protected. “Cover it with a plastic sheet or insulation so the cold wind doesn’t stiffen his joints,” says David E. Harling, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in Greensboro, North Carolina, who specializes in orthopedics and ophthalmology.
Let him sleep in. “When it’s cold and damp outside, your arthritic pet is going to hurt,” says Ralph Womer, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in Auburn, Alabama. “Your pet’s joints will thank you if you bring him inside for the night.
Make a cozy bed. “If your pet is sleeping on a hard surface, he’ll probably get some relieve fi you switch to something soft,” says Dr. Harling. During the cold months, he’ll appreciate curling up on a soft layer of synthetic fleece. You can even invest in a heated pet bed, available in some pet stores and animal supply companies.
Lay on something warm. A little moist heat, applied directly over painful joints, can be a real comfort to arthritic pets, says Sue Stephens, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
One trick is to use a hot water bottle (filled with warm, not hot, water). Or soak a towel in warm water, wring it out and drape it over the affected area. When the towel cools, replace it with a fresh one.
Apply the heat twice a day, morning and evening, for about 15 minutes each time. “It makes them feel so much better, especially in the morning when they tend to be stiffer,” says Dr. Stephens.
Be the Wizard of Ahs. Have you ever felt achy, and then some kind soul gave you a soothing massage? “Imagine being able to do that for your pet,” says Robert A. Montgomery, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in New Philadelphia, Ohio.
Gently kneed the sore area with small, circular motions, Dr. Montgomery says. Gradually extend the massage until you’ve gone a few inches beyond the painful joint, then gradually work your way back. “Once the animal looks more relaxed than when you started, you’ve done something right,” says Dr. Montgomery.
Raise the dinner table. If your pet has a stiff neck, try putting his food and water bowls up off the floor so he doesn’t have to lower his head as much at mealtimes, suggests Dr. Harling. You can put the bowls on a block of wood or in a firm box. Or you can buy a pet-bowl stand at pet stores.
For more ideas read The Doctors Book of Home Remedies for Dogs and Cats for these and more ideas.

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

 

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18

08 2011

Drooling

Pavlov’s dog had nothing on your pet. In fact, had the famous Russian physiologist- who learned to make dogs slobber at the ring of a bell- seen the way your pet salivates, he probably would have hired him on the spot.
While breeds like Basset Hounds and Saint Bernards are notorious droolers- largely because of excessive skin around their mouths- many dogs simply drool as part of their repertoire. “Some are so bad you want to fit them with a spit cut,” says Gary Beard, D.V.M. “They can probably drool a cup or more an hour when they’re worked up.” Nausea is another common cause of drooling, vets say.
Cats, on the other hand, rarely drool, and even most breeds of dogs drool only sparingly. But sometimes the moths of even the most refined pets wax a wee bit on the wet side. Try these tips from experts to help slow the flow.
Do a mouth check. If your pet is suddenly drooling more than usual, it could be because he has a foreign object lodged in his mouth. Slivers of plastic or wood are frequent causes of drippy mouths, says Dr. Beard. “Foreign material stimulates the salivary glands and can make a dog or cat quite drippy,” he says. “You may be surprised at what you find.”
Table the scraps. Those rich leftovers may suit your palate, but they can have messy and uncomfortable effects on your pet. “Drooling is one of the first signs of dietary distress,” warns Dr. Beard. “Watch what you feed your pet if you don’t want drooling or a sick animal.”
Travel in comfort. Even pets that are normally dry about the mouth can get somewhat drippy and queasy when riding in a car or boat. To prevent this, vets recommend feeding your pet nothing or very little for a few hours before traveling. (Giving them water is okay.) Once you’re under way, opening a window or letting your pet ride up front can help, says Dr. Beard. Taking frequent rest stops will also help keep his tummy calm.
Practice damage control. If your dog is a natural drooler whose fur frequently gets a little damp, try a bandanna around his neck to help protect him, says Steven Holmstrom, D.V.M.
To make a bandanna bib, fold a bandanna in half and tie it so the triangular side covers your dog’s chest. “Bandannas are like fashionable bibs,” he says. “A lot of show dogs wear them before they show.”
Wipe his jowl with a towel. Even dogs that usually drool just a little can get uncommonly wet when they’re in high spirits or running around. To keep your pet (and those he comes in contact with) slobber-free, use a paper or terrycloth towel to wipe his mouth.
In addition, if your pooch has been excitedly slobbering over other dog’s head, good doggy etiquette demands that you wipe off both dogs, says Charles A. Williams, D.V.M., “Friends will appreciate it if you take a towel along when you go to the park,” he says.
Put placemats in his place. The mere idea of food can make even the driest dog a veritable Niagara of enthusiastic anticipation. To keep your floors dry, Dr. Beard recommends rolling out the placemats when mealtime rolls around. “A large placemat under your dog’s bowl can help keep the place dry,” he says.
Information courtesy of The Doctors Book of Home Remedies for Dogs and Cats

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.


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12

07 2011

How To Recognize Cruelty Against Animals

Recognizing cruelty is simple, right?  Not quite, say ASPCA experts.  Aggressive, timid or fearful behavior doesn’t always tell the whole story.  Animals may appear to be mean or frightened for reasons other than abuse.

“It’s almost impossible to make conclusions based on a pet’s behavior alone,” says the ASPCA Animal Behavior Center’s Kirsten Collins, CPDT.  “The best way to tell whether a pet is being-or has been- abused is to examine him and his surrounding environment.”

Check out the ASPCA’s list of signs that may alert you to potential cruelty:

Physical Signs

  • Collar so tight that it has caused a neck wound or has become embedded in the pet’s neck
  • Open wounds, signs of multiple healed wounds, or an ongoing injury or illness that isn’t being treated
  • Untreated skin conditions that have caused loss of hair, scaly skin, bumps or rashes
  • Extreme thinness or emaciation- bones may be visible
  • Fur infested with fleas, ticks or other parasites
  • Patches of bumpy, scaly skin rashes
  • Signs of inadequate grooming, such as extreme matting of fur, overgrown nails and dirty coat.
  • Weakness, limping or the inability to stand or walk normally
  • Heavy discharge from eyes or nose
  • An owner striking or otherwise physically abusing an animal
  • Visible signs of confusion or extreme drowsiness

Environmental Signs

  • Pets are tied up alone outside for long periods of time without adequate food or water, or with food or water that is unsanitary
  • Pets are kept outside in inclement weather without access to adequate shelter
  • Pets are kept in an area littered with feces, garbage, broken glass or other objects that could harm them
  • Animals are house in kennels or cages (very often crowded in with other animals) that are too small to allow them to stand, turn around and make  normal movements

“Reporting suspected animal cruelty ensures that animals in jeopardy receive prompt and often life-saving care,” says ASPCA Supervisory Special Investigator Annemarie Lucas.  “By making a complaint to the police or humane society in your area- you can even do so anonymously- you help to ensure that animals in need are rescued and that perpetrators of animal cruelty are brought to justice.”

“Without phone calls from concerned citizens who report cruelty in their neighborhoods, we wouldn’t know about most instances of animal abuse.” –Annemarie Lucas ASPCA Supervisory Special Investigator

If you see signs of animal abuse, let others know!  Go to www.fightcruelty.org to find out how to report cruelty in your area.

Article thanks to ASPCA Action magazine Winter 2010

 
Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

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24

05 2011


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