Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’Category

Holidays

holiday-petsAs the Holidays approach, remember to keep your animals safe. Young dogs and cats are fascinated by the bright lights and shining ornaments on trees.

Remember Poinsettias and Holly are toxic to animals.

Also remember to keep burning candles where animals can’t knock them over. Never leave a candle unattended.

Oh, and remind your pets to be nice to Santa when he visits, something special may just be left for them too.

Happy Holidays!!

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and take care of your furry friend today.

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04

12 2015

Never Forget

Remembering this horrific event and keeping family, friends in our thoughts and prayers today and always.

Never Forget!

Thank you to all the unselfish, sacrificing people who gave all their hours to help with this tragedy.  This includes all the rescue dogs who were brought to doe search and rescue.

Remembering 9/11….we are forever changed.

God Bless America

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and take care of your furry friend today.

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11

09 2015

COLD WEATHER TIPS

Dog Lying on Ground
Our friends at the ASPCA and Petfinder.com have provided us with some cold weather tips for your pets.

Please follow these guidelines to protect your companion animal when the temperature drops.
Keep your cat inside. Outdoors, cats can freeze, become lost or stolen, or be injured or killed. Cats who are allowed to stray are exposed to fatal infectious diseases, including rabies.
During the winter, outdoor cats sometimes choose to sleep under the hoods of cars, where it is warmer. Then, when the motor is started, the cat can be injured or killed in the fan belt. To prevent this, bang loudly on the hood of your car and wait a few seconds before starting the engine, to give a cat a chance to escape.
Never let your dog off the leash on snow or ice, especially during a snowstorm. Dogs frequently lose their scent in snow and ice and easily become lost. They may panic in a snowstorm and run away. More dogs are lost during the winter than during any other season
Thoroughly wipe off your dog’s legs and stomach when she comes in out of the rain, snow or ice. Check her sensitive paw pads, which may bleed from snow or ice encrusted in them. Also, salt, antifreeze or other chemicals could hurt your dog if she ingests them while licking her paws.
If you own a short-haired breed, consider getting a warm coat or sweater for your dog. Look for one with a high collar or turtleneck that covers your dog from the base of her tail on top and to the belly underneath. While this may seem like a luxury, it is a necessity for many dogs.
Never leave your dog or cat alone in a car during cold weather. A car can act as a refrigerator in the winter, holding in the cold. Your companion animal could freeze to death.
If your dog is sensitive to the cold due to age, illness or breed type, take him outdoors only long enough to relieve himself.
Puppies do not tolerate the cold as well as adult dogs and may be difficult to housebreak during the winter. If necessary, paper train your puppy inside if he appears to be sensitive to the weather.
If your dog spends a lot of time engaged in outdoor activities, increase his supply of food, particularly protein, to keep his fur thick and healthy.
Antifreeze, even in very tiny doses, is a lethal poison for dogs and cats. Because of its sweet taste, animals are attracted to it. Be sure to thoroughly clean up any spills from your vehicle. To prevent accidental poisonings, more and more people are using animal-friendly products that contain propylene glycol rather than the traditional products containing ethylene glycol. Call your veterinarian or The ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center (ASPCA/NAPCC) if you suspect your animal has been poisoned.
Never shave your dog down to the skin in winter. Leave the coat in a longer style, which provides more warmth. Remember that such a style will require more frequent brushing due to dry winter air and static electricity. When you bathe your dog, make sure she is completely dry before you take her out for a walk.
Make sure your companion animal has a warm place to sleep far away from all drafts and off the floor, such as in a dog or cat bed or basket with a warm blanket or pillow in it.
Courtesy of
ASPCA
424 East 92nd St.
New York, NY 10128-6804
(212) 876-7700

 

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and take care of your furry friend today.

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12

12 2013

Recall Alert

I wanted to take a moment to update all of you on a recall alert that came through this morning on Eukanuba.
Please visit http://www.eukanuba.com/en-US/SpecialAnnouncement.pdf
website for all the details to protect your pet.

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15

08 2013

Most Popular Dogs in the U.S. for 2012

The American Kennel Club has recently announced the Top 10 most popular dog breeds.

Counting backwards in the number 10 spot, we have the Rottweiler – Rottweilers are intelligent, obedient and great protectors, but very playful and loving toward their families

In the number 9 spot we have the Dochshund – Dochshunds are lively, playful and known to be excellent hunters.  Their name means “badger dog” in German.  Great family pets because they adapt well and love children

 

 

In the number 8 spot is the Poodle – no surprise poodles are quite popular due to their intelligence and hypoallergenic coats.

 

 

In the 7th spot we have the Boxer – Boxers adore their humans, especially children. They are protective and patient. This breed was developed in the 19th century for the sole purpose of dog-fighting – they would stand on their hind legs for battle and that is how they earned the name “Boxer”

In the 6th position we have the English Bulldog.  This dog is often used as a mascot for universities.  Bulldogs have short legs, smushed face and plenty of slobber to go around. They make very good family pets due to their gentle and protective personalities and for humans, they are very easy to groom.

The 5th position is held by a petite breed, th Yorkshire Terrier. Yorkies have wonderful personalities, adorable little faces and easy to pick up and take with you wherever you go. In England they were often utilized as rat wranglers.

In 4th place we have the beloved Golden Retriever.  Is there anything to dislike about this breed?  Goldens are active, friendly, beautiful, versatile and due to their intelligence and devotion have been used as Guide Dogs for the blind and Search-and-Rescue dogs.  They have an even temperment and playful attitude.  The perfect family pet for young and old.

 

The 3rd place is taken now by the Beagle.  The Beagle has ranked in the top 10 every year since its acceptance to the AKC registry in 1885.  Beagles are happy and enjoy the company of other dogs and humans.  You will find this curious little pup does follow his nose to mischief once in a while.

In 2nd position we have the majestic German Shepherd. This breed gained popularity in the 1920’s following the film “Man from Hell’s River” featuring the famous Rin Tin Tin.  The German Shepherd is an excellent dog to keep you company and has consistently been used as a service dog for the police and military.  TIME even named a German Shepherd its distinguished “Animal of the Year” for helping to take down Osama bin Laden in conjunction with the Belgian Malinois who looks similar in appearance.

 

 

Now our 1st place breed for the 21st consecutive year…..you guessed it, the Labrador Retriever. (read down further in our blog posts to learn more about this wonderful breed)  The “Lab” is gentle, friendly and a wonderful family pet.  They come in 3 color varieties and are active and trustworthy companions.  They too are often used as service dogs for the handicap and as guide dogs for the visually impaired. This breed was originally bred to work along side fishermen and hunters to retrieve game but they do enjoy fetching your local paper.  Labs have a very calm temperament and are easily trained.

 

 

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

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01

02 2013

Animal Fighting Bill

On January 23, 2013 the Animal Fighting Spectator Prohibition Act was reintroduced.  This bill is geared toward strengthening our federal laws against animal fighting.  ASPCA supports the bill and I hope you will too.

It is already a federal crime to actively participate in animal fighting, it is the spectators who make this a profitable enterprise.  The bill would make it a federal offense to attend an organized animal fight and would impose additional penalties for bringing a child to observe the fight.

In previous congressional sessions the Senate passed the bill but when it hit the House, over half supported the bill but never passed it.  By reintroducing this bill, it gives us an opportunity to build on the momentum from the last Congress and help to finaly close the federal loophole for animal fighting spectators.

If you believe this to be as important as I do, won’t you please contact your House representative and request support for the bill?  You can visit the ASPCA Advocacy Center right now to quickly email your U.S.Rep in Washington and urge for cosponsorship of the Animal Fighting Spectator Prohibition Act.

http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com7

With the increase in costs to treat your pet for illness, Pet Insurance is a great option to help combat the costs of medical treatment.  Click on the link above for your free estimate.  All policies provide a percentage going to benefit the ASPCA.

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

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29

01 2013

Saying Goodbye to a Friend and Companion

If anyone has lost a pet, you know how hard it is to say goodbye to your companion, your friend and to some – family.  For me, one of the most difficult things to do is having to make the choice to have a pet put down.  It’s hard enough losing an animal but to have to make the decision for them is heart wrenching.

Animals can’t tell you when they are sick or when they hurt.  You need to deduce their illness based on behavior.  Some animals, like cats, will go great lengths to show that they are not ill.  This is a survival instinct.  Change in appetite, change in sleep patterns, in exercise, urination or defecation, lack of play…these are all signs that something isn’t right with your pet.   When this happens, seek veterinary assistance immediately.  The sooner an animal is treated, the better they will feel and you will too.

Today I find myself in one of those very difficult situations where I have done all I can for one of my animals.  For several months we have tried various things to help him yet his weight is down another pound and he is now half the cat he used to be.  After discussing matters with the vet, weighing what the illness possibilities are verses his age and the amount of testing he would have to go through, as a family we decided to not allow him to suffer through all that.  We allowed him to go peacefully and with dignity.

This was such a difficult decision since I had rescued him from my neighborhood where he was starving just about 9 years ago.  He was about the same weight when he died as he was when I found him.  Previous owners had declawed all four of his paws and he had no means of defending himself or of catching any prey for his supper.  For three months I religiously brought fresh food and water out to him.  He would never let me get close to him.  Then one October day when the temperatures dropped so low, this poor cat couldn’t take being cold one more day.  As I went outside to bring him food and water, he crawled into my lap without coaxing.  I picked him up and he wrapped his paws around my neck and waist and held on tightly much the same as a two year old child would.  I took him in, gave him a blanket to snuggle in, took him to the vet to be checked out because I had other cats, and we found that he was very ill from eating something in the wild.  He had an intestinal infection of sorts and one of the worse cases of ear mites the vet had ever seen; so bad in fact that they were completely swollen shut.

 

Within a few months he began improving, eating better, allowing us to touch him once in a while and he took a liking to my other male cat.  They were good friends and played well together.

I was able to give him 9 additional years to his life that he would not have had if he remained out doors.  Still, it is painful to say goodbye but in my mind, I see him watching birds and chasing butterflies somewhere in a field we have yet to experience.

Goodbye dear friend, Lunar.  

 

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

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22

02 2012

Other Pets To Consider

Sure, dogs and cats make fantastic companions.  But a pack of other pets can hop, gallop, swim and slither their way into your heart, too.  Each comes with its own special considerations.  Here’s a guide to help you discover which furry or scaly friend is perfect for you.

Rabbits

Positives: Rabbits are playful, friendly and form close bonds with their owners.  They can also be litter-trained so the next time you’re stuck in drive-time Beltline traffic you can rest assured Mr. Whiskers will be fine until you get there.

Downside: Rabbits need more than pellet food- namely, roughage in the form of hay and fresh vegetables.  So you might need to garb an extra tote bag for your Farmers’ Market excursions.

Perfect for: Apartment and condo residents anywhere.  Rabbits make only slightly more noise than a carrot, and their cages are hardly a space-hog.

Price Tag: $30-$45

 

Horses-

Positives: Graceful, beautiful animals that embody the rugged individualism.  Carbon footprint high on your concerns?  Park the hybrid in the garage and strap on that saddle, cowboy.

Downside: Drilling fence holes is really hard work, and where in the world to keep all that hay?  Also, a simple pooper-scooper and plastic baggies are out.  See: shovel.

Perfect for: Only those with the biggest yards (or fields) on the outskirts of the city.

Price Tag: $1000 and up

 

Fish-

Positives: Extremely quiet and soothing.  Maybe you like the water.  Guess what: so do they-it’s an instant bonding moment.

Downside: Cleaning the tank is work-intensive, daily feedings are needed and setup costs can be steep.  Live on the third floor with no elevator?  Lugging the tank upstairs can be a hassle.

Perfect for: People with kids.  Also, if you’re feeling info-overload, you can ditch the TV and put a fish tank in its place.

Price tag: $2-$50

 

Snakes-

Positives: You’ll definitely stand out in a crowd, and they’re easy to care for- you only have to feed them once a week or so.  Short on cash?  Take your reptilian down a busy street and make a few bucks as a street performer.

Downside: If they happen to get loose, catching them won’t be as simple as putting out a dish of food and calling their name.

Perfect for: Counterculture Isthmus dwellers.

Price tag: $40 to $200

 

Mice & Rats-

Positives: Incredibly smart, interactive and playful.  They’re also big fans of day trips, so throw them in your coat pocket and take them for a trip.  Easily amused by the torn-up newspaper (recycle!) padding in their cages.

Downside: Short life spans, so not for those looking for a long-term attachment.  Unfortunately, no one’s invented a tailless rat, so you’re going to be stuck looking at that thing.

Perfect for: Price point and ease of care make rodents perfect for students, or busy families with one too many dogs already.

Price Tag: $6-$15

 

Article courtesy of Madison Magazine December 2008

 

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

 

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13

10 2011

Animal Control Taking Things Deeming Dogs “Potentially Dangerous” With No Proof

Whose Pet is Safe with This Kind of “Animal Control”?
Minneapolis Declares Dog “Potentially Dangerous” After Having Apparently Hurting No One or Nothing
Published 09/23/2011 05:50:17 PM

by Mike Fry

I knew it would happen. I predicted it would happen. And, now, it is happening. A new ordinance passed in 2010 in the City of Minneapolis to make it easier for Animal Control to declare dogs either “dangerous” or “potentially dangerous”, even if the dogs have, technically, done nothing wrong, is going to court. Animal Ark’s legal team had previously concluded that the new ordinance was overtly unconstitutional.

The ordinance, among other issues, described so-called “aggressive” dog behavior in terms our legal team believed were illegal due to what is termed the “void for vagueness” doctrine. This doctrine states that, “If a person of ordinary intelligence cannot determine what persons are regulated, what conduct is prohibited, or what punishment may be imposed under a particular law, then the law will be deemed unconstitutionally vague.”

The language is pretty clear. If a law does not clearly indicate what behavior is prohibited by the law, in specific, objective terms, the law is unconstitutional. The new Minneapolis ordinance allowed Animal Control to deem any dog “dangerous” or “potentially dangerous” even if it had never bitten, and based entirely on testimony of a so-called “victim” (even if there was no injury).

The change in law followed several low-profile cases where MACC had tried to deem friendly pets “dangerous”. In the most extreme case, MACC reportedly issued a “destruct order” for a 12-week-old Golden Retriever puppy. A young girl had been playing with the puppy and was running in circles with the puppy chasing her. The girl tripped and fell on the puppy.

A minor injury resulted. Adults present when this event occurred reported that no one really knew if the injury was a result of a bite from the puppy, or from the child falling. Yet, reportedly, the City of Minneapolis issued a “confiscation” order for the puppy.

Fortunately, the puppy’s owner lived in another municipality. So the City of Minneapolis needed to send a request to that city to get the puppy. When police officers arrived at the home of the “guilty” “golden retriever” they were reportedly shocked to find a small, playful puppy that had a “dangerous dog” declaration on its head. Fortunately, the officers refused to confiscate the puppy. This story was corroborated by the officers.

A similar story was also reported to Animal Ark, that had an unfortunate ending. A young girl was playing fetch with a young lab at a family celebration. They played for at least a couple of hours, and no aggression was observed from the dog. However, following the play session, the parents of the girl noticed a small mark on the palm of her hand. When questioned about it, the girl indicated the mark was caused by the stick she had been throwing for the dog.

In spite of the explanation, the girl’s parents filed a complaint with Minneapolis Animal Care and Control. In spite of the best efforts of the owner of the dog, it was reportedly killed by the City of Minneapolis as a “Dangerous Dog”.

There was another, more public, case of Minneapolis Animal Care and Control issuing a kill order on a dog that had simply barked at the mail carrier. I am not making that up.

I first learned of that case before I knew about the others. One morning, I received a call from a television news reporter. She described the situation as one in which a medium-sized dog got out of the house as the mail carrier was delivering mail. A child in the home had failed to latch the screen door, and the dog easily pushed it open. The mail carrier turned and began to run away from the barking dog (something mail carriers are supposed to be trained to never do… because doing so can cause a dog to chase and bite). The dog followed the mail carrier a short distance, still barking, but did not bite. The dog’s owner quickly came outside and brought the dog inside.

Not knowing about the other potentially problematic cases of Minneapolis Animal Care and Control over-reacting to what appear to be normal dog behaviors, I told the reporter that I didn’t believe the story and that I could not comment until I personally verified it with the City of Minneapolis.

I hung up and called Minneapolis Animal Control. I spoke with Animal Control Officer Tom Doty, who personally verified the facts in the case.

The dog, that had done nothing other than bark at the mail carrier, was being held at Minneapolis Animal Control, labeled as “dangerous” and an order to have the dog destroyed was in place. The owner of the dog was appealing. I was speechless.

When news of the story broke, I began receiving complaints from other Minneapolis residents about the City confiscating and killing their dogs for behaviors that did not meet the legal definition of “dangerous”. Some of the stories were corroborated by others. The cases referenced above were some of the most egregious.

Fast forward to 2010: MACC uses another high-profile case – in which a mail carrier was actually bitten and injured by a dog – to push through a new ordinance that allowed them to deem animals “Dangerous” or “Potentially Dangerous”, even if they have never bitten anyone or anything. From my perspective, they appear to have been implementing an ordinance to try to make “legal” what they had apparently been doing for quite a while.

In the current case, a dog, that, even according to Minneapolis Animal Care and Control Records, does not appear to have bitten any person or animal, is being declared “potentially dangerous”. Predictably a law suit is coming forward.

When the new, unconstitutional ordinance was being considered by the city of Minneapolis, we wrote letters and sent emails to various City officials objecting to the ordinance on Constitutional grounds. Most of the officials never responded.

We did receive a response from Burt Osborne, Director of Regulatory Services for the City of Minneapolis. His response read, in part:

“Quit threatening a lawsuit and just do it.  The legal system exists to settle disputes like this.”

It is worth pointing out that we never threatened any litigation against the City. We simply stated that our legal team felt strongly that the ordinance was overtly unconstitutional, and, if implemented, would result in expensive and unnecessary litigation. Osborne ended his email with the following statement:

“Quit bothering my staff who have real work to do.”
Apparently, the City is more than willing to squander resources defending unconstitutional laws and rounding up and killing animals that have done nothing wrong. Because of this, Animal Ark believes the legal challenge to the City is an important one. We are setting up a legal fund to help the dog’s owner defray some of the legal costs. People from all over Minnesota – and especially Minneapolis residents – cannot let Minneapolis get away with this. Tell the City you want them to follow the law, not make laws that let them do whatever they want.

Do so by making a donation to our Animal Legal Defense Fund.

More background on the current case

The current case involves a Husky-German Shepherd mix that was declared “Potentially Dangerous” following a one-time encounter with another dog. The encounter resulted in no significant injury to either dog or any person. In fact, in the report filed by Minneapolis Animal Care and Control about the case, the responding Animal Control Officer determined that he did “not have any evidence that allows me to determine that ‘Lupa’ did not bite another dog.”

This statement effectively placed the burden of proof on the dog owner to prove a negative – that his dog did not bite. This raises other serious Constitutional questions, as does the hearing process the City provided for the owner of the dog to try to do so.

As this case is preparing to move before the Minnesota Court of Appeals, one of the issues that will come forward is the Due Process clause of the U.S. Constitution as well as Article I, Section 7 of the Minnesota Constitution, which requires that there be a “meaningful” hearing, consisting of live testimony, rather than simply a determination based internal review of paperwork.

The lack of a meaningful hearing was recently addressed by another “dangerous dog” case, Sawh v. City of Lino Lakes, in which Minnesota Court of Appeals threw out “Potentially Dangerous” AND “Dangerous” designations because there was no “meaningful hearing” for the initial “Potentially Dangerous” designation, which was then used to later boost the dogs designation to “Dangerous”.

 

Article courtesy of animalarkshelter.org

 

 
Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

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25

09 2011

Burrs

You had a great time hiking through fields and forests, but now it’s time to pay the price. It seems your companion brought home a coat filled with bristly souvenirs- and you’re in charge of Operation Unstick.
Burrs are the rough, prickly seedcases of certain plants, and they seem to leap out whenever your pet passes by. Depending on where they lodge, burrs can cause matting, skin irritation or infection. What’s more, they can be as hard to remove as chewing gum.
To get around this thorny problem, try these tips from the experts.
Look for hideaways. Burs can stick in the darnedest places, so you’ll want to inspect your pet closely for these hidden prickly pains, says Hazel Christiansen, owner of Blue Ribbon Pet Grooming Shop Association. “Check between all the toes, on top of the feet, around the testicles and in the armpits- Just about anyplace there’s a little crevice,” she says.
Take the dry road. Once burrs get snarled into your pet’s coat, be sure to remove them before he manages to get himself wet. “The tangled hair around the burr will shrink like a wool sweater after it gets wet, and you’ll have an extra-hard time trying to get the burr out,” says Linda A. Law, a certified master groomer and director of the Canine Clippers School of Pet Grooming in Dumfries, Virginia.
Put your fingers to work. “It’s really important to remove burrs as soon as you can so they don’t dig in and create mats and irritations,” says Law.
If the burr has only recently lodged, you may be able to remove it with just your fingers or a pair of tweezers. If it’s been there longer, however, it may be tangled inside a hair mat. To undo the mat, pull it apart with your fingers little by little, working from the end of the hairs down toward the roots. After you get the burr out, run a comb or brush through the hair to really smooth things out, advises Law.
Loosen ‘em with a lube job. When a burr is really tangled, applying a little vegetable oil will help get it loose, says Shirlee Kalstone, a New York City groomer and author of The Complete Poodle Clipping and Grooming Book. A spritz of detangling spray, available at pet stores, can also help. If you’re buying a detangling spray for your cat, however, read the label to make sure it’s feline-friendly, Kalstone adds.
Try the kindest cut. If you’re have trouble removing burrs with your fingers, try cutting them out, says Kathe Barsotti, a certified master groomer and owner of Featherle Pet Care in Herndon and Sterling, Virginia. She recommends using blunt-tipped scissors to avoid accidentally gouging your pet. It’s best to cut perpendicular to the mat, not parallel to it. “Just make sure you’re cutting hair and not skin,” she says.
Keep it short. Keeping your pet’s coat neatly trimmed won’t prevent burrs from sticking, but it will make them easier to remove. “Then at least the burrs won’t stick so badly,” Barsotti says.
Pass up prickly places. In the future, the one sure way to avoid burrs is to stay away from infested areas. If you’ve had a problem with one trail or field, walk your animal somewhere else next time,” says Kalstone.

For more ideas read The Doctors Book of Home Remedies for Dogs and Cats for these and more ideas.

Interested in Pet Insurance – visit http://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/barkpurrandinsure for a no obligation quote and find out all the advantages of having a plan for your furry companion.

 

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22

09 2011


Facebook Like Button for Dummies